Disney Cultural Representative Program: Applying & Pre Screens

Applying for the Disney Cultural Representative Program (CRP) for the UK Pavilion

What is the Disney Cultural Representative Program? (CRP)

The Cultural Representative Program is a one year program offered by Disney to certain nationalities. Disney employs people from all over the world to come and work at the World Showcase in it’s Epcot theme Park. The World Showcase is a section that is made up of eleven pavilions themed to different countries. They are:

Mexico

Norway

China

Germany

Italy

United States

Japan

Morocco

France

United Kingdom

Canada

There are other countries that Disney offers programs to in addition to this, to see if you qualify for one of their programs, you can visit there site here.

If you’re from the UK and want to apply for the Cultural Representative Program at Walt Disney World, you first have to submit your application.

In order to do this and check out further information about the program you can visit the yummy jobs website. This is the agency that deals with all the Disney international programs for applicants within the UK and some of Canada

http://www.yummyjobs.com

Application Stage

I applied for the Cultural Representative program last year in August, the 24th to be exact! This was my fourth time applying. I’d made it through to the Pre-Screen stage the previous year and this was my fourth attempt at applying.

I wasn’t planning on applying this round, as I’d applied 3 times already and wondered if it was worth it. I’m sure many others have this feeling when applying again. I’ve heard of some applying 7/8 times before they got accepted onto the program. Which, just goes to show that it can happen at any time! Part of me applied this time on a wim, I’d already gotten through to Pre-Screens before, so why couldn’t I do it again? I refused to accept no as the answer, this was my dream job and I wasn’t going to give up!

Putting together my CV

Before applications opened, I was in the process of looking for a new job, and as I’d love to work in the travel and hospitality business I started to look for local jobs that A) help me do this in the future and B) be good experience for the CRP. At this point I knew I’d be going to Canada in November, so if I’d gotten a no I still had something else planned and it just meant I’d apply next round and enjoy Canada for longer.

Not long after applications opened, I got offered my job at Whistler Blackcomb. Being North America’s biggest ski resort, I thought this would be a great addition to my application. I ended up getting a job at my local airport in Duty Free, which I loved and I learned a lot from it and it gave me that international experience for my CV. At weekends, I’d work my other job at a local pub, this gave me experience in food & beverage. So I really tried to gear my CV towards something they were looking for.

I started putting together my CV and cover letter. I’ve made lots of cover letter drafts for this program. And this one was by far the best. In the past I’ve overthought the whole thing, and rewritten my cover letter 20 times and it stressed me out. I tried to Disney-fy it but I think I went overboard at one stage. This time I still “disneyfied” my CV but I made it very subtle, as to keep it professional at the same time.

Writing My Cover Letter

I wrote my cover letter in two or three drafts. I wrote what I felt they needed to know about me and how my experience would be beneficial to Disney, specifically the UK pavilion. I also mentioned a bit about what I’d get out of the program, but I made this part a little more specific. In terms of work experience, I mentioned my current jobs and previous jobs and how they related back to the international nature of the program. Things I could bring from my current and previous jobs to represent the UK, for example, serving British branded beers and British baked goods. (I used to work for a large UK chain of bakeries) I also mentioned what my next “adventure” would be, AKA moving to and working in Canada.

After deciding that my CV and cover letter mentioned everything I wanted it to, I uploaded my documents and submitted them. For the next few days I didn’t really think about the application. I had a feeling of hope but was also prepared for the rejection. Anyone who has applied more than once will know the feeling I’m talking about! But slowly, the feeling of excitement crept back. What if I did make it through to Pre-Screens? I mean I have done it before, and if I’ve done it before surely I could do it again? And I did!

Pre Screens! AKA Best feeling ever

On the 6th of September, the email came through. One of the best emails of my life! I hadn’t bothered checking my emails because I just didn’t think I’d get it. So a day later when I finally did, I jumped out of my chair. Eyes widened. It was the best feeling in the world. Last time around I didn’t tell anyone I’d applied or what the interview was for until a week before Pre-Screens, thinking that doing so would jinx it! Well, it didn’t make any difference in the end, so this time around I just mentioned that I’d applied to my family and when I got offered Pre-Screens I told them right away!

As I’d done pre-screens the year before, I knew how the day would roughly go. Last year I definitely overthought the whole thing and as a result I was far too nervous. I’ve had a lot of interviews and they don’t make me nervous, but this was DISNEY! A dream job! How could I not be nervous!? I was still nervous this time around, but much less so. Having experienced this part of the application once already it helped calm my nerves and therefore enjoy the day much more.

I’d booked a hotel for the night before, as last time I traveled down on the day and as a result was tired the whole time. It was much nicer to get a good nights sleeps and meet some other applicants prior to the interview. The hotel that I stayed at was called the Bell Hotel, which isn’t the greatest place I’ve ever stayed but for one night it was adequate and was also the cheapest. If you are thinking of traveling down on the day I’d highly recommend looking into staying the night as it really helped to calm my nerves as I knew the office was only a short walk away.

The day was very similar to last time but as usual they change little things each time. This year there were three dates instead of two, and less groups. I’m not sure how many people they interviewed or if there were less people at this stage than last year, but at a guess I’d say there were 150 applicants. This time around we were interviewed as a group and then individually. Usually at the this stage, it is only a group interview. I think this way is a much nicer way because sometimes in a group you don’t always get that time to ask questions, say what you need to. And if there’s something specific you’d like to say and forget you do get that second chance.

The Interview

The day started with the same videos they showed us last time, and even though I’ve watched these several times on youtube too, I never get tired of seeing them. Anna and Luke were awesome, they really lifted the mood throughout the whole thing. We were all given a name tag sticker, which had our group name on and the time in which we’d be interviewing and also our individual interview times.

Prior to the interview, they ask you to bring with you something that represents your hometown. I really overthought this last year. So this year I decided to go simple and just print out photos of things that I could talk about. A lot of people take this approach. It doesn’t have to be the world’s most interesting object as long as you can talk about a place and be passionate about it. Teach people something that they didn’t know before.

My interview time (if I remember correctly) was about 11:30. I was team Bruce! It was really nice to hang out and get to know people in my group.

The group interview was really chilled, and as a group I think we really clicked and bounced off each other which was a nice feeling. Some ice breakers were to chat to the person sitting next to you and find out 3 things about them. They were: Your name and where you’re from, your favourite Disney memory, and an interesting fact about you. They also gave us a few fun activities to do as a team. We had to create a British themed party event. We came up with a game called “Bru Pong” in which you take the game of beer pong and replace it with mini scotch eggs and Irn Bru. Sounds pretty disgusting eh? And lastly another activity involving a bamboo stick. I’ll leave you curious with that one.

Then, more waiting. Our group left the office and joined the other groups over at Starbucks and filled the time by playing heads up – Disney version.

I ended up being able to get an earlier interview which was nice as I had work early the next day. In the one on one interview they ask you the general questions like availability and why you want to do the program, your experience etc. They end it with asking what Disney character you are most like. This isn’t a guaranteed question, I’ve prepared for this in the past and it never came up until now. So have your answer ready just in case!

After my interview I said my goodbyes to everyone and wished them luck, gave them some info on the questions I got asked and went on my merry way. I didn’t feel overly confident at this point. I thought my individual interview let me down but I’d done all that I could do.

Then, the waiting began. Again.

 

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